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Somerset Area School District

Somerset School District

Highway Safety Curriculum

Course Description: The Highway Safety Curriculum consists of Defensive Driving Techniques, Driving Skills, Pennsylvania Traffic and DUI Laws, and Driving Responsibilities.  Instruction will also include specific truck and motorcycle laws and regulations.  Emphasis will be placed upon Pennsylvania's DUI Regulations.  Professional resource personnel from the Pennsylvania State Police, Insurance Profession, and the Coroner's office will be utilized to enhance awareness, compliment, and reinforce traffic safety.  Additionally, safety assemblies and films will be scheduled to promote traffic safety awareness.

 

Classroom Resources:

American Driver and Traffic Safety Education Association: Driver Education Curriculum 2.0

Pennsylvania Drivers Manual

 

Assessments: Participation, Classroom Activities, Quizzes, and end of unit tests.

 

Unit 1: Non-Commercial Learners Permit Information

This unit will make the students aware of the proper steps for young drivers to get their learners permit and license in the state of Pennsylvania.  Students will understand the proper steps and materials that they must have completed in order to be able to take their permit test. 

 

Objectives:

The students will:

• Participate in a teacher-led introduction and discussion of the school’s policies, procedures, facilities and requirements for highway safety and driver education.

•Understand the importance of communication between all the participants in the driver education program (teacher, student and parent/guardian/mentor).

• Participate in a discussion of the Pennsylvania licensing system and its requirements.

• Watch slides 1.1 through 1.11 of the ADTSEA Curriculum to enhance presentation.

• Complete Unit 1 Test.

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Graduated Licensing System

Learner’s Permit.

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.1 Pennsylvania Laws and Regulations

C.  Describe the Pennsylvania licensing procedures

                        - Learner’s Permit

                        - Graduated Licensing System

 

Unit 2: Signs, Signals, and Lane Markings

During this unit students will learn about traffic signals, signs, and pavement markings that are important to know and understand thoroughly in order to get their permit as well as when they begin driving.  They will learn about the 3 different categories of signs and the meanings of the different colors of lane markings as well as the difference between solid and broken lines.

 

Objectives:

The students will:

• Understand the difference between a regulatory, warning, and guide sign.

•Be able to describe the common characteristics of each category of sign in regards to shape and color.

• Be able describe what a driver should do at each of the different situations in regards to lights whether it’s a solid red, yellow, or green or a flashing yellow or red. 

• Understand the Pennsylvania law about “Right of Way” and also understand what lights with arrows mean.

• Understand the difference in the colors of markings on the road as well as describe what they should do when they see these markings.

• Understand the basic speed limits in different situations in the state of Pennsylvania

• Be able to describe the rights of pedestrians in the state of Pennsylvania.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Driving Lane

Right of Way

Regulation Speed/Basic Speed Law

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.1 Pennsylvania Laws and Regulations

A.  Identify and explain traffic laws related to safe driving.

                        - Traffic Controls (e.g., signs, signals, road markings)

                        - Right-of-Way

                        - Speed Regulations

                        - Pedestrian rights and responsibilities

 

 

Unit 3: Operator and Vehicle Control Tasks in a Controlled Environment

Unit 3 will introduce the student to the location and operation of vehicle information, control devices and routine checks and adjustments to be made prior to and after entering the vehicle.

Movement of a motor vehicle, stopping, vehicle operating space, use of signals, speed, intersection maneuvers, and right-of-way, will be reviewed and analyzed.

 

Objectives:

The Student will:

Participate in teacher-led discussion of the importance of occupant protection to include proper use of and the life saving value of occupant protection.

Discuss occupant protection systems that will address the contribution of safety belts to increased survivability in a crash.

Participate in teacher-led discussion of the symbols used to identify the location and function of the safety, communication, comfort and convenience devices found in motor vehicles.

Discuss occupant protection systems that will address the contribution of safety belts to increased survivability in a crash.

Participate in teacher-led discussion of putting vehicle in motion, braking and stopping, lane position, backing straight, turns, and moving to and from the curb

Watch slide 2.1 through 2.31 of the ADTSEA curriculum to enhance presentation.

Participate in teacher-led discussion of the problems associated with driving at night, in fog, rain, snow, smoke, hot and cold temperatures and when there are strong cross winds. The instructor will use the videos “Night Driving” and “Driving in Bad Weather.”

Participate in teacher-led discussions of the advances in occupant protection, including automotive technology designed to protect vehicle occupants or enhance a driver’s ability to respond in the event of loss of traction or other emergency.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Antilock Braking System (ABS)

Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC)

Pre-trip/Post-trip inspection

Supplemental occupant restraint systems

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.2 Knowledge of Vehicle Operations

            A. Identify and describe the pre-trip inspection outside the vehicle.

                        - Visual inspection of vehicle

                        - Visual inspection of surroundings

B.  Identify and describe the pre-trip preparation inside the vehicle

            - Car door locks

            - Key in ignition

            - Seating position

            - Mirror Settings (enhanced/traditional)

            - Communications controls (turn signals, high/low beams, flashers)

            - Safety Devices (wipers, seat belt adjustments, head restraint)

            - Comfort/climate controls (heater, AC, defroster)

            - Hand Position on steering wheel

C. Identify and assess purpose of modern vehicle technology

            - Owner’s manual specifications

            - Alert and warning symbols

            - Supplemental occupant restraint systems

            - Antilock Braking System (ABS)

            - Global Positioning System (GPS)

            - Electronic Stabilization Control (ESC)

E. Identify post-trip procedures

            - Securing the vehicle

            - Exiting the vehicle

                         

Unit 4: Space Management System

Unit 4 will introduce operator procedural and information processing tasks in a low risk driving environment. Basic vehicle maneuvering tasks will include using procedural steps, driver information processing and an introduction to the space management system. The space management system will be used to determine appropriate roadway position, appropriate vehicle speed and appropriate communication with other users. Roadway characteristics discussed will be interaction with intersections, surface conditions and traffic controls.

 

Objectives:

Students will:

Participate in a teacher-led discussion using the space management system and SIPDE.

Participate in a teacher-led discussion of the time space needs of drivers and the function of central and fringe vision.

Participate in a teacher-led discussion of developing a dynamic visual search process and the inadequacy of a 2-second following distance.

View the video Managing Space and Time for Safe Driving and participate in a teacher led discussion on risk reducing strategies.

View the video Using Your Eyes Effectively and participate in a teacher-led discussion on proper scanning techniques

Use a space management system to manage path of travel, visual lines of sight, space between vehicles and evaluate alternate paths of travel or speed adjustments to reduce risk

Participate in teacher-led discussion using the space management system for managing intersection problems in this unit

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Decision-Making

Driving Line

Hydroplaning

Overdriving Headlights

Perception (SIPDE)

Risk Situation

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.2 Knowledge of Vehicle Operations

D. Describe and explain the proper application of basic driving skills.

            - Staying in driving line

            - Starting from a stop

            - Accelerating

14.3 Perceptual Skills Development

            A. Describe perception as a mental process that is selective and can be improved

                        - Visual Functions

                        - Projected path of travel

                        - Scanning environment and staying in driving lane

            B.  Describe visual search categories for identifying risk situations

                        - Restrictions to path of travel

                        - Restrictions to sightline

                        - Traffic controls

                        - Highway Characteristics/conditions

                        - Other Highway users

D. Analyze the need for divided visual and mental attention from path of travel to driving       tasks and then back to path of travel for brief periods of time.

-Searching from path of travel to signs, symbols and markings

- Searching from path of travel for intersection problems

- Searching from path of travel to new entry lane when turning left or right

- Searching from path of travel to instrument panel for speed and vehicle information

                        - Searching from path of travel to vehicle accessories for appropriate operation

14.4 Decision-making/Risk Reduction

            A. Identify and know a model of decision-making.

- Stop-Think-Go

- SIPDE (Search, Identify, Predict, Decide and Execute)

- IPDE (Identify, Predict, Decide and Execute)

- SEE (Search, Evaluate, Execute)

14.5 Driving Conditions

A. Describe hazardous conditions and their effects on vision, motion and steering control tasks while driving.

-Snow #12

-Rain #11

-Fog

-Sleet/ice

-Hydroplaning

-Traction loss

B. Identify challenges of night driving and appropriate responses to them. #10

-Reduced visibility

-Eye fatigue

-Overdriving headlights

 

Unit 5: Basic Maneuvering Tasks

This Unit will introduce operator procedural and information-processing tasks, including basic vehicle control, space management, lane changing, turnabouts and parking. Basic vehicle maneuvering tasks will include using procedural steps, lane changing, turnabouts, parking, and driver information processing and practicing the space management system. The space management system will be used to determine appropriate roadway position, appropriate vehicle speed, and appropriate communication with other users.  This unit will also introduce the driver to procedures and information-processing tasks in moderate to high risk environments. Emphasis will be placed on entering, driving on and exiting expressways at speeds up to 65 mph. Also, smoothness of steering, speed control and lane position and selection on expressways will be covered. Vehicle law dealing with passing, lane changing and speed limits and content on expressway entrances and exits will be presented. Risk reducing strategies will be presented for the driver to learn to drive collision-free in the high-speed expressway environment.  Finally this unit will present drivers with information about large commercial motor vehicles (CMV’s). Content will include types of commercial motor vehicles, stopping distances for CMV’s, CMV’s turning left and right, driving behind trucks, passing trucks, meeting oncoming trucks, trucks merging onto highways, and off-tracking.

 

Objectives:

The students will:

• Demonstrate procedural tasks and vehicle control tasks in non-complex roadway situations using procedures for lane changing, multiple turnabouts, and parking a vehicle.

Demonstrate an appropriate sequence of procedures in changing lanes, passing, parking, and turning around.

•Participate in teacher-led discussion on expressway characteristics, types of interchanges, entering and exiting expressways.

Participate in teacher-led discussion of your state’s vehicle law regarding passing, being passed, and minimum and maximum speed limits on expressways.

Identify the “no zones” of CMV’s.

List the procedures for passing, following and meeting CMV’s.

Identify the hazards associated with CMV’s making left and right turns.

Analyze the stopping distance of CMV’s vs. passenger vehicles.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Fatigue

Response Time

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.1 Pennsylvania Laws and Regulations

C.  Describe the Pennsylvania licensing procedures

                        - Learner’s Permit

                        - Graduated Licensing System

14.2 Knowledge of Vehicle Operations

D. Describe and explain the proper application of basic driving skills.

            - Staying in driving line

            - Starting from a stop

            - Accelerating

14.3 Perceptual Skills Development

            B.  Describe visual search categories for identifying risk situations

                        - Restrictions to path of travel

                        - Restrictions to sightline

                        - Traffic controls

                        - Highway Characteristics/conditions

                        - Other Highway users

            C. Identify Traffic Situations and develop avoidance strategies

                        - Judging speed going around a curve

                        - Searching for sufficient gap before pulling out from a driveway or stop sign

- Reducing crash potential by adjusting speed, lane position, and appropriate   communication

- Recognizing a stopped vehicle

- Changing speed or direction to avoid conflicts with sightline and path of travel restrictions

- Judging speed and distances of on-coming traffic

- Making correct decisions at intersections by managing time and space

- Applying basic driving skills to city, rural, and expressway driving in various weather and roadway conditions

D. Analyze the need for divided visual and mental attention from path of travel to driving        tasks and then back to path of travel for brief periods of time.

-Searching from path of travel to signs, symbols and markings

- Searching from path of travel for intersection problems

- Searching from path of travel to new entry lane when turning left or right

- Searching from path of travel to instrument panel for speed and vehicle information

                        - Searching from path of travel to vehicle accessories for appropriate operation

14.4 Decision-making/Risk Reduction

B.  Identify and describe concerns when sharing the roadway

                        - Motorized Vehicles

                        - Non-motorized vehicles

                        - Commercial/large vehicles

                        - Pedestrians

                        - Animals

Unit 6: Environmental Factors and Malfunctions Influencing Operator Performance.  Distracted Driving, Trip Planning, Collision Reporting

This unit will have the new driver explore the effects of fatigue, drowsy driving and impact of emotions on one’s driving ability.  This unit will also introduce students to the problems associated with driving under conditions of inclement weather, limited visibility and limited traction. Specific attention will be directed to vehicular factors and increased time/space needs under such conditions relative to following, being followed, gap selection when crossing and turning, traveling with traffic in adjacent lanes, passing and adjusting to the actions of pedestrians.  Trip planning will be introduced with attention to purpose of trip, risk management, i.e., traffic density, time of travel and anticipated travel time.  Driving under conditions of limited visibility and traction, the use of flashers and lights other than headlights, and the use of safety restraints will be reviewed and analyzed.

Finally this unit will present the driver with information about vehicle system functions and malfunctions, and what to do if involved in a collision. In addition, yielding the right-of way to emergency vehicles will be covered.  Content will include the meanings of various dashboard warning lights and the techniques used to respond to various vehicle malfunctions such as loss of brakes, loss of steering, tire blowouts, vehicle fires and others. It will also include content on interacting with other highway users and what to do if the driver is involved in a collision including, collision reporting requirements, what to do if the driver is involved in a collision.

 

Objectives:

The students will:

Recognize how fatigue affects driving and how to reduce the effects of fatigue.

Relate emotions to driving and discuss “road rage.”

Understand the problems associated with driving at night, in fog, rain, snow, smoke, hot and cold temperatures and when there are strong cross winds.

Be able to describe the advances in occupant protection, including automotive technology designed to protect vehicle occupants or enhance a driver’s ability to respond in the event of loss of traction or other emergency.

Understand loss of traction and how it affects the movement and control of your vehicle, how to detect and respond to various types of traction loss and how to return safely to the paved roadway after drifting or steering onto the shoulder.

Be able to describe ways of dealing with vehicle systems and system malfunctions.

Understand how to respond to various emergencies caused by vehicle malfunctions.

Understand the state laws on collision reporting requirements and behavior at the scene of a collision.

Make choices to avoid distractions while driving

Recognize the nature of the distracted driving problem

Define distracted driving

Relate state’s laws to distracted driving

Understand potential driving distractions

Understand distractions’ effects on the driving task

 

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Aggressive Driver

Non-aggressive Driver

Road Rage

Divided Attention

Peer Pressure

Hazardous Condition

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.1 Pennsylvania Laws and Regulations

B.  Identify and explain the laws that relate to responsible use of a vehicle

                        - Child safety seats

14.4 Decision-making/Risk Reduction

            C. Identify how emotions affect driver decisions

                        - Depression/Sadness

                        - Elation

                        - Anger

                        - Road Rage

                        - Fear

            D. Describe the characteristics of the aggressive driver.

                        - High Speed

                        - Erratic vehicle movements

                        - Gestures

                        - Vocal outbursts

            E. Identify appropriate responses to the aggressive driver.

                        - Eye contact avoidance

                        - Emotional detachment

                        - Speed adjustment

                        - Lane adjustment

            F. Identify driver distractions and the appropriate responses to them.

                        - Within vehicle (e.g. passengers and pets, food and drinks, cell phones and other                          electronics)

- Outside the vehicle (e.g. construction zones, people, accident and emergency vehicles)

            G. Analyze the consequences of high-risk driver actions and human error.

                        - Vehicular Crashes

                        - Property damage

14.5 Driving Conditions

            C. Identify the dangers of vehicle malfunctions

                        - Warning indicators (e.g. dashboard, smoke, sounds)

                        - Failures (e.g. tires, brakes, steering)

                        - Stuck accelerator

                        - Engine stalls

                        - Loss of headlights or forward vision due to vehicular malfunction

            D. Identify the dangers of sudden emergencies

                        - High water

                        - Vehicle crossing centerline

                        - Vehicle no yielding at intersection

                        - Vehicle running off the roadway

                        - Traction loss to front tires

                        - Traction loss to rear tires

Unit 7: Driving under the influence: Alcohol and other drugs, Pennsylvania Point System, seat belt laws, and cost to own and maintain a car.

Unit7 is designed to give the student an understanding of the significant effects of alcohol and other drugs on a person’s ability to perform the driving task. Statistics will indicate that alcohol is a significant factor in fatal motor vehicle crashes for individuals between 15 and

24 years of age. Many who use alcohol also use other drugs. This use compounds the effects and creates a serious problem for the new driver.  We will cover the information on underage drinking and drinking and driving.  This unit will contain several guest speakers from the community including the county coroner and a member of the Pennsylvania State Police.

 

This unit also gives the student an understanding of the point system in the state of Pennsylvania.  Students will understand what points are assessed for and how the points are removed from their driving record.  Students will also learn the seatbelt laws for the state of Pennsylvania ranging from newborn babies to adults.  Finally the students will learn about the costs to owning a car from the initial purchasing of the vehicle to insuring it and also maintaining the car.

 

Objectives:

The students will:

Make choices and take responsibility to say “No” in regard to using alcohol and other drugs while operating a motor vehicle.

Recognize the nature of the alcohol-related traffic crash problem.

Relate your state’s alcohol and other drug laws to driving.

Understand physiological and psychological effects of alcohol on the driving task.

Recognize how alcohol affects driving ability.

Understand how drugs other than alcohol affect the driving task.

Understand the PA Point system and how points are received and removed from their record.

Recognize how points affect insurance.

Know the seatbelt laws in Pennsylvania.

Understand how expensive it is to own and maintain a car.

 

Academic Vocabulary:

Civil Liability

Driving Under the Influence

Motor Skills

Emissions inspection

Implied Consent

Peer Pressure

Social Norms

Zero Tolerance

Response Time

 

Pennsylvania State Academic Standards:

14.1 Pennsylvania Laws and Regulations

B.  Identify and explain laws that relate to responsible use of a vehicle.

                        - Vehicle Registration

- Insurance regulations

                        - Vehicle/emissions inspection

                        - Seat belts

                        - Child safety seats

                        - Passengers in pickup trucks

 

14.4 Decision-making/Risk Reduction

            G. Analyze the consequences of high-risk driver actions and human error.

                        - Vehicular Crashes

                        - Property damage

 

14.6 Influences upon Driver Performance

            A. Know legal aspects of alcohol and other drug use.

                        - Just saying “No” to alcoholic beverages and other drugs.

                        - Terms and meanings associated with drinking and driving.

                        - Penalties when intoxicated.

                        - Implied consent

                        - Zero tolerance

B. Evaluate the factors that influence individuals to use alcohol and other drugs.

                        - Advertising

                        - Peer Pressure

                        - Social norms

                        - Culture

                        - Holidays

C. Define and analyze the problem of driving under the influence (DUI)

                        - Significance of problem

                        - Consequences

                        - Solutions

D. Identify and analyze the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol on the driver.

            - Process of alcohol entering and exiting the body.

            - How alcohol affects people differently.

            -Changes to the central nervous system

E. Identify and analyze the physiological and psychological effects of drugs.

            - Types (i.e., over the counter, prescription, controlled substances)

            - How drugs affect people differently

            - Changes to the central nervous system

F. Identify and analyze how alcohol and other drugs affect driving performance.

            - Impaired judgment and reasoning

            - Visual impairment

            - Slower Motor skills

            - Increased response time

            - Loss of reality

G. Identify types of fatigue and how to combat their effects.

            - Mental and physical types (e.g., boredom, eye strain, drowsiness)

            - Symptoms (e.g., slowed response time, daydreaming, and heavy eyes)

- Methods to delay fatigue (e.g., exit and walk around the vehicle every 2 hours, pull over and take a nap, stop for a bathroom/snack break)

Last Modified on July 17, 2013